Appaloosa coat patterns, coat colour genetics and practical information for breeders of spotted horses - The Appaloosa Project Appaloosa coat patterns, coat colour genetics and practical information for breeders of spotted horses - The Appaloosa Project
Appaloosa coat patterns, coat colour genetics and practical information for breeders of spotted horses - The Appaloosa Project
 
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Featured Appaloosa Project Scientist
Lynne Sandmeyer

Lynne Sandmeyer, DVM, DVSc, DACVO

Dr. Lynne Sandmeyer leads the members of our team that take part in veterinary ophthalmology research on CSNB in the Appaloosa. Lynne joined the Appaloosa Project early in the spring of 2005, and has been working on CSNB-related research with us ever since.

As Associate Professor of Small Animal Clinical Sciences at the Western College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Saskatchewan, she has both clinical and instructional responsibilities. Her official location/designation is a little misleading, as veterinary ophthalmologists treat both small and large animals – Lynne works on every sort of animal eye, from hamster to horse.

In spite of a very busy schedule at the university, Lynne takes time out every day with her pets, as the accompanying picture shows. When she is able to take a longer break from her duties, she loves to travel.

We interviewed Lynne recently for the Appaloosa Project’s “Featured Scientist” web page:

Where did you grow up?
I grew up in Calgary Alberta.

Where did you go to school?
I went to Lord Beaverbrook High School in Calgary, then did 3 years at the University of Calgary before getting into the Western College of Veterinary Medicine at the University of Saskatchewan in Saskatoon.

Following my DVM I went to the Ontario Veterinary College for an Internship and then did my Ophthalmology residency and graduate training at the OVC.

What made you choose veterinary ophthalmology as your specialization?
I was fascinated by the eye. It is an intricate anatomical and physiology system, and it is beautiful to look at. As an ophthalmologist I can practice medicine and surgery and get to examine many different species of animal.

Why are you interested in scientific research?
I feel that research is a natural extension of an inquisitive mind. I am humbled by how much we, as scientists, do not know and how much there is to discover. It is exciting to be able to ask a question and then devise a way to answer it, and the answer is very often not what you thought it would be. I also hope that by doing small pieces of research that I am contributing to the overall well being of animals.

What are you working on now?
Currently I am working on our CSNB project among some smaller projects.

Conclusion:
Though she is too humble to mention it, Lynne Sandemeyer has already begun to make her mark as an important contributing member of the larger scientific community, having several significant ophthalmology research papers to her credit. Her intense curiosity about the natural world and keen powers of observation combine to make her a terrific scientist, but Lynne is also committed to a collective approach, which makes her a delight to work with. We are truly fortunate to have Dr. Lynne Sandmeyer on the Appaloosa Project team!

Sheila Archer

Created on 02/23/2007 12:03 AM by adm1n
Updated on 05/22/2008 08:05 AM by SheilaArcher
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